Effects of Pulverized Compost Materials and Composting Durations on Early Growth of Savannah Mahogany Khaya senegalensis (Desr.) A. Juss in a Semi-Arid Ecosystem of Nigeria

  • Paul F. Adeogun Department of Forestry and Wildlife, University of Maiduguri, P.M.B. 1069, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria.
  • Musa Garba Department of Forestry and Wildlife, University of Maiduguri, P.M.B. 1069, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria.
  • Abubakar Usman Department of Forestry and Wildlife, University of Maiduguri, P.M.B. 1069, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria.
  • Alim Gupa Department of Forestry and Wildlife, University of Maiduguri, P.M.B. 1069, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria.
Keywords: Early growth, compost, pulverize, biomass, semi-arid

Abstract

The study was carried out in the Nursery of the Department of Forestry and Wildlife, University of Maiduguri, Nigeria, to assess the effects of pulverized compost materials (PCM) and composting durations on the early growth of Khaya senegalensis in Maiduguri, Nigeria. Leaves of Azadirachta indica, Gmelina arborea, Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Arachis hypogea were collected within the premises of University of Maiduguri. The leaves were sundried and pulverized before buried for 30, 60, and 90 days at the depth of 45cm and grouped into (M1-M5). Viable seeds sown at 3cm depth. Eighteen polythene pots arranged randomly in three replications were used for the experiment. Data were taken four weeks after sowing on stem diameter, stem height and number of leaves on weekly basis for the period of eight weeks, while root length and biomass were determined at the end of the experiment. The data collected were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) using Statistix (8.0) DMRT was applied for mean separation. The result obtained from the analysis of variance revealed that PCM5 (pulverized leaves of G arborea, E camaldulensis and A hypogea) at eight WAS produced the highest value (2.54mm) while PCM1 (pulverized leaves of A indica, G arborea, E camaldulensis and A Hypogea) at five WAS had the least stem diameter value (0.88mm). T3 (90 days composting) had the highest stem value (2.14mm) which was significantly different (P=0.05) from T1 (30 days composting) and T2 (60 days composting). The result obtained for stem height showed that PCM5 (pulverized leaves of G arborea, E camaldulensis and A hypogea) at 12 WAS had the highest value (13.94cm) while PCM1 (pulverized leaves of A indica, G arborea, E camaldulensis and A hypogea) at five WAS had the least stem height value (3.99cm). It was also observed from the result obtained on composting durations for stem height that T3 at 12 WAS had the highest value (12.18cm) while T2 at five WAS had the least value (4.21cm). The result obtained for number of leaves showed that PCM5 at 12 WAS had the highest value (9.67) while PCM1 at five WAS had the least value (2.22). It was evident from the result obtained for number of leaves that T3 at 12 WAS had the highest value (8.50) while T1 and T2 at five WAS had the least value (2.50). The result obtained for root length analysis showed that PCM5 produced the highest root length value (9.28cm) while control had the least value (5.27cm). The result obtained for biomass showed that PCM2 pulverized leaves of A indica, G arborea and E camaldulensis) produced highest weight value (0.56g) while PCM3 pulverized leaves of A indica, G arborea and A hypogea) had the least value (0.28g). T1 had the highest value which was not significantly different (P=0.05) from T2 and T3. Based on these findings, it was concluded that PCM5 at 12 WAS showed effectiveness on stem diameter, stem height, number of leaves, root length and biomass which indicates its potentials as a good source of nutrients (compost) for seedling growth and development.

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Published
2021-07-18
Section
Articles