Nurses` Perception Regarding Diabetic Wound Care at Primary Health Care Level

  • Siham Ahmed Balla Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum. Khartoum , Sudan. Postcode: 11111
  • Sulaf Ibrahim Abdelaziz Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan. Postcode: 11111
  • Kamil Mirghani Ali Shaaban Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum. Khartoum , Sudan. Postcode: 11111
  • Haiedr Abu Ahmed Mohamed Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum. Khartoum , Sudan. Postcode: 11111
  • Mohamed Ali Awadelkareem Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum. Khartoum , Sudan. Postcode: 11111
  • Asia Abdullah Belal Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum. Khartoum , Sudan. Postcode: 11111
Keywords: diabetic wound, nurses, health centers, training.

Abstract

One of the challenges regarding quality of care at primary care level is diabetic wound services; where the nurses are the pillar in wound care. The study objective was to determine the perception of nurses regarding the diabetic wound services in the health centers.  A descriptive qualitative study carried in Khartoum State Sudan targeted nurses at the health centers. Focus Group Discussion (FGD) was carried out using semi-structured open ended questions. Saturation of information was obtained after four FGD sessions resulted in 26 nurses. Informed consent was signed and obtained from each nurse. Two independent qualified researchers carried out content analysis of the recorded information. The results show that female to male ratio was 2:1. Most of nurses were holders of Technical Nursing Certificate. Almost all nurses have not received in-service training about diabetes and diabetic wound care. Factors affecting diabetic wound services were lack of guidelines for services and follow-up registry, insufficient consumables and dressing materials and negative patients` attitudes. In-service training on diabetic wound care was absent. Guidelines and follow up registry for diabetic wound care were not available at the health centers.  Health centers were lacking sufficient dressing and surgical materials. Strengthening the capacity of nurses and availing adequate resources and services` guidelines are recommended. 

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Published
2017-02-16
Section
Articles