Growth Performance of Grasscutters (Thryonomys Swinderianus) in Captivity Fed on Pelleted Forage and Cassava Tubers with the Peel in Ghana

  • Seidu J.M College of Agriculture Education, University of Education, Mampong-Ashanti, Ghana
  • Dzisi K.Ab College of Engineering, Department of Agriculture Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
  • Addo A.G College of Engineering, Department of Agriculture Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
  • Barte-Plange A. Barte-Plange A. College of Engineering, Department of Agriculture Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
  • Odai , B College of Engineering, Department of Agriculture Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

Abstract

It was also observed that it would cost GHȻ 21.70 for one kilogram weight gain feeding the grasscutter with Elephant grass whilst with the pelleted feed it would cost GHȻ 9.83 and GHȻ 6.85 for ration 1 and   ration 2 respectively feeding the grasscutter. Grasscutter farmers in Ghana are encouraged to feed their grasscutters with pelleted combination of Elephant grass, gliricidia leaves and cassava with the peel  with either urea or soy meal with other commercial ingredient as complete diets for sustainable grasscutter production in Ghana and countries south of the  sub-Saharan region . The study was to investigate the growth performance and quality of the meat of grasscutters in captivity fed on two pelleted diets made of Elephant grass, gliricidia leaves and cassava with the peel with urea as ration 1 and with soy bean meal as ration 2. The control was feeding with only Elephant grass. Feed intake, feed wastage, weight gain were measured and feed conversion ratio was calculated.  Feed intake and feed conversion ration were not significantly different at P> 0.05. Although the feed intake of the experimental animals was low on the pelleted feed their growth rate was numerically higher as compared to those fed on the Elephant grass ( Pennisetum purpurenum) only. The final body weight of the animals fed on the pelleted feed were not significantly different but were significantly different to those fed on the control feed p>0.05. Grasscutters are noted for their feed wastage, in the study feed wastage of the three rations were significantly different p>0.05.with the control feed recording the highest feed wastage. The dressing percentage of carcass  as well as the protein content of the meat of the animal fed on the pelleted diets were not significantly different but were significantly different to those of the control ( p>0.05).  

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Published
2016-03-25
Section
Articles